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Our proposals

Longridge Road Energy Centre is a new, privately funded £200 million Energy Recovery Facility (ERF) proposed for the Red Scar Industrial Estate (RSIE) on the edge of Preston. The project is being developed by Miller Turner. 

The Energy Centre will generate up to 40 Megawatts (MW) of low carbon electricity (and potentially heat) for distribution to businesses and other end users nearby. Distribution will be via the electricity grid, or a direct connection to businesses and other energy users – known as a ‘private wire’.

Longridge Road Energy Centre can produce dependable, local energy at lower prices, reducing costs for businesses in the area, helping to sustain existing employment in Lancashire and potentially attracting new employers.

Longridge Road Energy Centre will use the waste from households and businesses that remains after recyclable materials have been removed. In the UK, such leftover material, known as residual waste, is either landfilled, exported, or has energy recovered from it. By taking this leftover waste and using it to generate electricity, the Energy Centre can reduce waste going to landfill and reduce the region’s carbon footprint.

Location 

Longridge Road Energy Centre is being proposed on the southern part of RSIE, formerly the location of part of the Courtaulds factory (PR2 5NE). The site is approximately 18 acres (7.3 ha) of undeveloped brownfield land. The closest site boundary is 300-350 metres east of the M6 motorway. The main buildings will be about 500 metres from the motorway at their closest.

The Energy Centre site is part of the currently un-redeveloped southern parts of the RSIE allocated for employment use in the Preston Local Plan. The RSIE, including the site of the proposed development, is also allocated for strategic waste management facilities, including energy recovery. 

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How energy recovery works

Longridge Road Energy Centre will take residual waste to use as a fuel to produce energy. Around 60% of the waste is biomass, making the energy that is generated from it low carbon.

The Energy Centre will use proven ‘moving grate’ technology in operation at a similar scale at hundreds of plants across the world, including about 40 in the UK. The combustion process produces heat, which is used to create steam. This then drives a turbine to generate electricity and recover the energy from the waste.

The electricity is then sold to the electricity grid, or to customers in the local area via a ‘private wire’ direct connection.

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Longridge Road Energy Centre, as with other modern ERFs, will operate within a closely monitored, strictly regulated environment. The Energy Centre will offer numerous energy and environmental benefits such as:

  • Reducing our reliance on coal and gas for energy – helping to cut down our carbon emissions

  • Contributing positively to tackling climate change

  • Combined with recycling, contributing to minimising landfill and its harmful methane emissions

  • Reducing reliance on energy imports from abroad

  • Providing a dependable baseload electricity supply

  • Preventing odour emissions associated with uncontrolled waste-handling and treatment

  • Providing energy to local businesses at low and stable prices

Key benefits

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  • Produces enough electricity to power up to 89,000 homes

  • Low carbon energy

  • Dependable source, generated locally

  • Potential to offer lower cost electricity via ‘private wire’

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  • Up to 500 people employed during construction 

  • 40 permanent jobs 

  • Apprenticeship opportunities 

  • Potential to preserve or attract hundreds of new jobs by providing cheaper electricity to nearby employers

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  • £200 million of investment

  • Requires no public subsidy

  • Significant additional business rates per year for Local Authorities 

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  • Converts residual waste, destined for landfill, into power

  • Capacity to process up to 395,000 tonnes of residual waste per year

  • Reduces waste going to landfill in Lancashire

Topic information sheets

Ahead of our consultation events in March, we have produced a number of topic information sheets to help provide you with an extra level of detail about the proposals for Longridge Road Energy Centre.

You can download these from the buttons below.

FAQs 

What is Longridge Road Energy centre?

Longridge Road Energy Centre is a new, privately funded £200 million Energy Recovery Facility (ERF) proposed for the Red Scar Industrial Estate (RSIE) on the edge of Preston. 

How much Energy will be produced?

The Energy Centre will generate up to 40 Megawatts (MW) of low carbon electricity (and potentially heat) for distribution to businesses and other end users nearby. Distribution will be via the electricity grid, or a direct connection to businesses and other energy users – known as a ‘private wire’.

Longridge Road Energy Centre can produce dependable, local energy at lower prices, reducing costs for businesses in the area, helping to sustain existing employment in Lancashire and potentially attracting new employers.

Who are Miller Turner?

Miller Turner are the development team bringing forward proposals for Longridge Road Energy Centre. They have a track record of developing green energy plants in the ERF, biomass, wind and solar power sectors – including the 40MW Tilbury Docks wood-fuelled electricity generating station in East London.

What type of waste will be used?

Longridge Road Energy Centre will only use residual waste – the waste from households and businesses that remains after recyclable materials have been removed. Currently in the UK, residual waste is either landfilled, exported, or has energy recovered from it.

How much waste will the Longridge Road ENergy Centre take?

Longridge Road Energy Centre will have the capacity to process up to 395,000 tonnes of residual waste per year – helping to reduce the waste going to landfill in the area, and converting it into energy.

Will there be any air pollution or odours from the facility?

Longridge Road Energy Centre will use technology that is well established, closely monitored, and in use safely at numerous sites across the UK and abroad.

It will be constructed to the highest environmental standards and will be the subject of strict environmental regulations. These regulations will be embodied in an Environment Agency (EA) operating permit. The permit is issued after close scrutiny of a detailed application. The permit will require comprehensive environmental monitoring to be undertaken throughout the operational life of the Energy Centre. Monitoring results will be reported to the EA, who have the power to modify or halt operations if necessary.

All waste deliveries will be unloaded within the plant and lorries will be either enclosed or covered to prevent dust and litter. Any odours will be completely contained within the plant by maintaining negative air pressure in the waste reception building and feeding that air to the combustion chamber where odours are destroyed.

how will the local environment be considered?

A full Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) will be undertaken to ensure that all matters relating to the environment are considered when developing Longridge Road Energy Centre. The EIA will be presented through the preparation of an Environmental Statement (ES), which will accompany the planning application that will be fully considered by the Local Planning Authority when deciding whether to support the development. A wide range of environmental subjects will be taken into consideration including air quality, traffic, landscape and ecology.

When the planning application is submitted, documents from the application suite and ES will be made available on this site.

What will the FACILITY look like?

Miller Turner is working closely with expert architects to ensure that the building’s layout and design reflects its proposed setting.

The design process for the building’s exterior will be iterative and will develop through consultation with Lancashire County Council, the public, and other stakeholders during the pre-application period. This includes seeking comments on areas external to the buildings, which will be landscaped and screened where appropriate.

As part of the EIA process, a Landscape and Visual Impact Assessment (LVIA) will be undertaken and explained in the ES in accordance with a methodology compliant with Landscape Institute and Institute of Environmental Management and Assessment Guidelines.

Although the design of the building is being finalised, the proposed development will include a building of up to approximately 35 to 40 metres in height, 170 metres in length and 70 metres in width. There will be one or two slim chimney stacks about 85 metres high and up to three metres in diameter. Plans and drawings of the building will be available on this website.

We will continue to update these numbers as the finalisation of the facility’s design is completed.

Key features to ensure that the facility is sustainable, modern and responds to its environmental setting include:

  • Bespoke buildings to fully enclose operations

  • Gas cleaning and emission-control equipment

  • Traffic management and noise abatement

  • Surface water management

Will there be increased traffic through residential areas?

The Energy Centre will have excellent road connections. RSIE can be accessed directly from Junction 31a of the M6 Junction and the B6242 Bluebell Way as well as the B6243 Longridge Road avoiding the need for traffic to be routed through residential areas.

Access within RSIE is purpose-built industrial estate roads right to the boundary of the site.

Will the facility impact on local ecology?

We are carrying out a comprehensive investigation of the ecological and biological features of the site and the surrounding areas. Longridge Road Energy Centre’s site is former industrial land that has been cleared and prepared for redevelopment. The design of the facility will include measures to enhance local biodiversity.

How will the local community benefit?

Longridge Road Energy Centre will create jobs during both its construction and operational periods. Once operational, it has the potential to help preserve nearby existing employment, and attract new employers to the area by providing cheaper electricity directly to local businesses. Measures will be included to ensure that employment opportunities are made available to the local workforce.

In addition, a community fund of £65,000 will be created to support projects that benefit local groups and people.

An education outreach programme will be developed, with education materials and site visits available. This will enable local school and college students to learn more about the energy recovery process, climate change, energy resources and biodiversity. Visitor centre facilities will be provided within the operational Energy Centre.

An apprenticeship scheme and training programmes will also be provided in support of an estimated 40 full-time operational roles.

 Timeline

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Have your say

We will be running a pre-application public consultation for a period of six weeks from Friday 15 February to Friday 29 March 2019.

All feedback received during this period will be considered on an ongoing basis by the project team and suggestions will be incorporated into the scheme where possible. 

We will be holding two public drop-in sessions to provide stakeholders and members of the public an opportunity to discuss the proposals with members of the project team on the following dates:

  • Wednesday 13 March 2019, 4pm - 8pm Norman Jepson Beefeater, Bluebell Way, Fulwood, Preston, PR2 5PZ

  • Thursday 14 March 2019, 10am – 2.30pm Norman Jepson Beefeater, Bluebell Way, Fulwood, Preston, PR2 5PZ

To find out more or to contact the Consultation Team for Longridge Road Energy Centre you can:

  • Call us on our freephone information line at 0800 032 1880

  • Email us at info@longridgeroadenergy.com

  • Write to us at Freepost LONGRIDGE ROAD ENERGY CENTRE

News

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Pre-APPLICATION consultation begins for Longridge Road Energy Centre

We will be running a pre-application public consultation for a period of six weeks from
Friday 15 February to Friday 29 March 2019.

All feedback received during this period will be considered on an ongoing basis by the project team and suggestions will be incorporated into the scheme where possible. 

We will be holding two public drop-in sessions to provide stakeholders and members of the public an opportunity to discuss the proposals with members of the project team on the following dates:

  • Wednesday 13 March 2019, 4pm - 8pm Norman Jepson Beefeater, Bluebell Way, Fulwood, Preston, PR2 5PZ

  • Thursday 14 March 2019, 10am – 2.30pm Norman Jepson Beefeater, Bluebell Way,
    Fulwood, Preston, PR2 5PZ

 

Contact us

To find out more or to contact the Consultation Team for Longridge Road Energy Centre you can:

  • Call us on our freephone information line at 0800 032 1880

  • Email us at info@longridgeroadenergy.com

  • Write to us at Freepost LONGRIDGE ROAD ENERGY CENTRE